Rolling Stock

December 2014 RailKing Product Spotlight

RailKing O Gauge 4-Bay Cylindrical Hopper

Until the advent of the covered hopper, bulk commodities like grain and cement were packed in sacks and loaded into boxcars. Loading and unloading was a tedious, time-consuming affair. In the 1930s, a few railroads took the basic coal hopper design and added a roof with loading hatches, enabling bulk commodities to be loaded from the top and unloaded from the bottom. In 1953, Pullman-Standard’s 70-ton PS-2 became the first mass-produced covered hopper to be widely owned by U.S. railroads.

December 2014 RailKing Product Spotlight

RailKing O Gauge 33K Gallon Tank Car

The tank car was relatively uncommon until the 1870s, when the nascent petroleum industry ordered large quantities of metal tanks carried on wooden car bodies. By the early 1900s, a standard design had evolved that lasted throughout the steam and early diesel eras: an 8,000-11,000 gallon metal tank perched on a metal flatcar-like underframe.

November 2014 Premier Product Spotlight

Premier Line O Scale 4-Bay Hopper 6 Car Set

This car is likely the last hurrah of the bottom unloading coal hopper. Its prototype was built largely in the 1960s and ‘70s, just before the destinations for these cars — mainly utility power plants and harbor side shipping facilities — began switching to rotary unloading. While many of these cars survive in service today, newer coal cars are technically not hoppers at all. With trough-like bottoms and no hopper doors, they’re actually high-sided gondolas designed solely for rotary unloading.