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October 2014 Premier Product Spotlight

Premier Line O Scale 6-Car 70-Ton 3-Bay Hopper Set

Unlike equipment that carried a variety of loads, like boxcars, flatcars, and gondolas, this 3-bay hopper was designed specifically for one cargo: bituminous coal. Its capacity matched the volume of coal that a pair of typical 70-ton freight trucks could carry. And its slope sheets — the angled floors at either end of the car — were set at precisely the angle at which coal would flow easily from its bottom doors. (Covered grain hoppers, for example, require much steeper slope sheets.)

October 2014 Premier Product Spotlight

Premier Line O Scale 4-Bay 100-Ton Hopper

This car is likely the last hurrah of the bottom unloading coal hopper. Its prototype was built largely in the 1960s and ‘70s, just before the destinations for these cars — mainly utility power plants and harbor side shipping facilities — began switching to rotary unloading. While many of these cars survive in service today, newer coal cars are technically not hoppers at all. With trough-like bottoms and no hopper doors, they’re actually high-sided gondolas designed solely for rotary unloading.

September 2014 RailKing Product Spotlight

RailKing O Gauge Steel Caboose



Like most pieces of railroad equipment, this caboose was shaped in part by regulatory requirements — in this case, a proposed Pennsylvania law requiring cabooses on through
freights to be 8-wheeled and at least 24’ long. Based on a wood-sheathed 1920 USRA design, this steel caboose was a 1924 Reading Company design that became so widespread
in the mid-Atlantic region that railfans dubbed it the Northeastern Caboose.

September 2014 RailKing Product Spotlight

RailKing O Gauge Tank Car



The tank car was relatively uncommon until the 1870s, when the nascent petroleum industry ordered large quantities of metal tanks carried on wooden car bodies. By the early 1900s, a standard design had evolved that lasted throughout the steam and early diesel eras: an 8,000-11,000 gallon metal tank perched on a metal flatcar-like underframe.

September 2014 RailKing Product Spotlight

RailKing O Gauge Husky Stack Car



On April 26, 1956, a revolution in shipping began when the first container ship, a converted oil tanker named Ideal X, left Port Newark, NJ headed for Houston. The brainchild of truck-driver-turned-shipping-magnate Malcolm Purcell McLean, containerization was a giant step forward in shipping efficiency, security and cost.

September 2014 Premier Product Spotlight

Premier Line O Scale Standard Tank Car

The tank car was relatively uncommon until the 1870s, when the nascent petroleum industry ordered large quantities of metal tanks carried on wooden car bodies. By the early 1900s, a standard design had evolved that lasted throughout the steam and early diesel eras: an 8,000-11,000 gallon metal tank perched on a metal flatcar-like underframe.

September 2014 Premier Product Spotlight

Premier Line O Scale 75’ Depressed Center Flat Car with Transformer

For transporting large or heavy items over land, nothing beats a railroad flat car. No wonder that manufacturers use flat cars to ship products or sub-assemblies ranging from transformers to airliner fuselages to heavy construction and mining equipment.

September 2014 Premier Product Spotlight

Premier Line O Scale 70-Ton 3-Bay Hopper

Unlike equipment that carried a variety of loads, like boxcars, flatcars, and gondolas, this 3-bay hopper was designed specifically for one cargo: bituminous coal. Its capacity matched the volume of coal that a pair of typical 70-ton freight trucks could carry. And its slope sheets — the angled floors at either end of the car — were set at precisely the angle at which coal would flow easily from its bottom doors. (Covered grain hoppers, for example, require much steeper slope sheets.)